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Fourth Year (Level Four)

 

Semester - 1

   

Course Title

 Carbohydrates & Amino acids and Proteins

 

 

Course Code

13061

Academic Year

2008 / 2009

Coordinator

Prof. Ahmed M Safaan

Other Staff

 

 

 

Semester

Semester 1  

Level

Level Three

Pre-Requisite

 

Course Delivery

Lecture  

14 x 2h lectures  

 

Practical  

14 x 4h practicals  

Parent Department

Chemistry Department

Date of Approval

July, 2008

 

Aims

- A study of the structure, reactivity, and synthesis of compounds occurring in nature with special emphasize on carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins, lipids,

- Give students a background about the major classes of carbohydrates: mono-, di- and polysaccharides.

- The synthetic pathways for preparation of amino acids, and polypeptides, their properties and their functions.

- An introduction to laboratory techniques and investigation, and identification of organic compounds.

 

Contents

 

 Part 1

  (Natural products) Two hours / week

Lecture 1

chemistry of carbohydrates: structure and nomenclature, classification, the structure and configuration of glucose

Lecture 2

ring structure, determination of ring structure, lengthening and shortening of carbon chain

Lecture 3

conformation, ­ mutarotation, glycosides

Lecture 4

vitamin c, disaccharides, polysaccharides

Lecture 5

proteins and amino acids:, α-amino acids (structure nomenclature and properties),

Lecture 6

synthesis and reactions of amino acids

Lecture 7

peptides and proteins: the primary structure of peptides, secondary & tertiary structure of large peptides and proteins

Lecture 8

peptide synthesis, denaturation.

Lecture 9

nucleic acids and nucleoproteins structure.

Lecture 10

lipids: classification and nomenclature,

Lecture 11

fatty acids, soaps,  detergents

Lecture 12

fats and oils, waxes, analysis of fats and oils

Lecture 13

phospholipids, lipid soluble vitamins

Lecture 14

Anthocyanines, flavones, iso-flavones.

Assessment

 

Student Assessment

Assessment Method

Skills assessed*

Assessment Length

Schedule

Proportion

Written Examination

KU, I

3 Hour Examination

The 16th Week

60%

Oral Assessment

KU, I

Assessment Session

Term Final

5%

Practical Examination

P

2 Hour Examination

The 15th Week

30%

Semester work

KU, I

Continuous Assessment

 

5%

*KU: Knowledge and Understanding, I: Intellectual, P: Professional, T: Transferable

List of references

 

Course notes:

-Organic Chemistry vol II 5th Ed. IL Finar, Longman 1975

- Principles of Medicinal Chemistry, 6th Edition (2007),  T. L Lemke, D. A Williams, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Essential Books:

- Organic Chemistry vol II 5th Ed. IL Finar, Longman 1975.

 - Principles of Medicinal Chemistry, 6th Edition (2007),  T. L Lemke, D. A Williams, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

 


  

Course Title

 Heterocyclic Compounds, Vitamins and Natural product

 

 

Course Code

13062

Academic Year

2008/ 2009

Coordinator

Prof. Mohamed A. abdou

Other Staff

 

 

 

Semester

Semester 1  

Level

Level Three

Pre-Requisite

 

Course Delivery

Lecture  

14 x 2h lectures  

 

Practical  

14 x 4h practicals  

Parent Department Chemistry Department

Date of Approval

July, 2008

 

Aims

- Study of the structure, reactivity, and synthesis of compounds occurring in nature with special emphasize on Stroids & vitamins.

- Study fundamental principles and advanced topics in organic chemistry; heterocyclic compounds including three, four,  five and six -membered rings with varied numbers of hetero atoms.

 

Contents

 

 Part 1:

Vitamins

Lecture 1

Definition, importance and classification of vitamins

Lecture 2

Fat soluble vitamin (A) Chemistry, absorption, occurrence, physiological roles, deficiency.

Lecture 3

Role of vision by vitamin A

Lecture 4

Fat soluble vitamin (D) Chemistry, absorption, occurrence, physiological roles, deficiency.

Lecture 5

Fat soluble vitamin (E, K) Chemistry, absorption, occurrence, physiological roles, deficiency.

Lecture 6

Water soluble vitamin (C) Chemistry, absorption, occurrence, physiological roles, deficiency

Lecture 7

Vitamins B complexes and coenzymes Chemistry, absorption, occurrence, physiological roles, deficiency

Lecture 8

Thiamine, riboflavine coenzymes Chemistry, absorption, occurrence, physiological roles, deficiency

Lecture 9

Niacine coenzymes Chemistry, absorption, occurrence, physiological roles, deficiency

Lecture 10

Role of FAD, NAD n many biochemical reaction

Lecture 11

Vitamin B6 coenzymes Chemistry, absorption, occurrence, physiological roles, deficiency

Lecture 12

Pantothonic acid, Biotein coenzymes Chemistry, absorption, occurrence, physiological roles, deficiency

Lecture 13

Folic acid, vitamin B12 coenzymes Chemistry, absorption, occurrence, physiological roles, deficiency

 Part 2:

 Hetrocyclic Compounds

Lecture 1

classification and nomenclature of heterocycls.    

Lecture 2

Three-membered rings:Saturated:oxirane,

Lecture 3

thiirane, aziridine. Unsaturated: azirines

Lecture 4

Four-membered rings: Saturated azetidine

Lecture 5

oxetane, thietane

Lecture 6

Unsaturated four-membered rings : oxete, thiete

Lecture 7

Five-membered rings (One-hetro atom): pyrrole

Lecture 8

Furan, hydrofuran

Lecture 9

 Thiophene).

Lecture 10

More than one-hetro atom: Imidazole, pyrazole,

Lecture 11

oxazole, isoxazole,

Lecture 12

thiazole, isothiazole

Lectures 13 & 14

Condenced five-membered rings: indole, benzofuran,  Benzothiphene

Assesment

 

Student Assessment

Assessment Method

Skills assessed*

Assessment Length

Schedule

Proportion

Written Examination

KU, I

3 Hour Examination

The 16th Week

60%

Oral Assessment

KU, I

Assessment Session

Term Final

5%

Practical Examination

P

2 Hour Examination

The 15th Week

30%

Semester work

KU, I

Continuous Assessment

 

5%

*KU: Knowledge and Understanding, I: Intellectual, P: Professional, T: Transferable

List of references

Course notes:

Course notes and Laboratory manual authorized by the Council of Department of Chemistry.

Essential Books:

- Heterocyclic Chemistry, 4th  Ed. J.A. Joule & K. Mills.  Blackwell Science Ltd   2000.

- Handbook of Heterocyclic Chemistry, 2nd  A. R. Kataritzky and A.F. Pozharskii,  Pergamon  2000.

- E. E. Conn and P. K. Stumpf , "Outlines of Biochemistry".

 


  

Course Title

Physical and Inorganic Chemistry

 

Instrumental Analysis (Spectroscopic Methods)

 

Chemical Kinetics and Surface Chemistry

 

Physical Biochemistry

Course Code

13063

Academic Year

2008 /2009

Coordinator

Prof. Mohamed Y. Ayad

Other Staff

 

 

 

Semester

Semester 1  

Level

Level Three

Pre-Requisite

 

Course Delivery

Lecture  

14 x 4h lectures  

 

Practical  

14 x 6h practical  

Parent Department

Chemistry Department

Date of Approval

July, 2008

 

Aims

 

1.   discuss the nature of light, different spectral regions and interaction between light and matter, and explore the theories and principles underlying spectroscopic methods of instrumental chemical analysis including their sensitivity with a great emphasize on the design of different spectroscopic techniques including the definition and function of each component as well as their applications in several analytical areas.

2. acquire students the basic concepts and definitions relevant to chemical kinetics and surface chemistry as well as study the factors affecting the rate of both simple and complex reactions and the methods of determining the order of reactions, with discussion of their kinetics and applications in chemistry and biology.

3- study the properties of colloids including micelles and emulsions as well as the characteristics of interfaces and surface phenomena.

4- Provide the students the physical properties of biological buffer, amino acids, blood and proteins.

5- Acquire the students determine the biochemical macromolecules (such as proteins and nucleic acids) and 6- to cover the physical properties these marcromolecules.

7- Give the students the physical means used in biochemistry such as gel electrophorsis, dialysis and chromatography

 

Contents

 

 Part 1:

 (Instrumental Analysis) one hour / week

Lecture 1,2

Introduction; nature of light, interaction between light and matter.

Lecture 3

Introduction to spectroscopic methods of analysis; principle, advantages and sensitivity.

Lecture 4,5

Components of optical instruments; light sources

Lecture 6

Optical filters and monochromators.

Lecture 7

Photodetecting systems.

Lecture 8,9

UV-visible absorption spectroscopy; principle, Beer's law and instruments.

Lecture 10

Applications of absorption spectroscopy.

Lecture 11

Fluorescence spectroscopy; principle, instrument and some applications.

Lecture 12

Flame photometry; principle, instrument and applications.

Lecture 13

Infrared spectroscopy; principle, instrument and applications.

 Part 2:

 (Chemical Kinetics) one hour / week

Lecture 1

Introduction to chemical kinetics (Definitions and principles).

Lecture 2

Experimental techniques used to follow reaction rates.

Lecture 3

Molecularity and order of reactions.

Lecture 4,5

Integrated rate equations.

Lecture 6

Methods of determining the order of reactions.

Lecture 7,8

Theories of reaction rates.

Lecture 9-11

Kinetics of complex reactions.

Lecture 12

Introduction to catalysis.

Lecture 13

Homogeneous catalysis.

Part 3

(surface chemistry) one hour / week

Lecture 1

Introduction to surface chemistry

Lecture 2

Colloids; classification and structural properties 

Lecture 3, 4

Preparation and purification of colloids, their kinetics and optical properties.

Lecture 5

Interfaces; liquid-gas and liquid-liquid interfaces

Lectures 6, 7

Surface activity; classification of surfactants, micelles and micellar properties.

Lecture 8

Applications of surfactants in detergency, oil recover and ore flotation.

Lectures 9-11

The solid-gas interface; adsorption of gases and vapors on solids, adsorption isotherms and surface area determination.

Lectures 12,13

Solid-liquid interfaces; adsorption from solutions, contact angle and wetting applications. Charged interfaces and electrokinetic phenomena.

Part 4

Physical biochemistry (One hour/ week)

Lecture 1

acid-base concept

Lecture 2

henderson-hasselbalch equation- buffers-

Lecture 3

pH in human body

Lecture 4

Blood buffering action

Lecture 5

Electrophoresis

Lecture 6

Dialysis and biological membranes

Lecture 7

ion exchange chromatography

Lecture 8

Spectrophotometry.

Lecture 9

ultracentrifugation

Lecture 10

Molecular weight determination by different methods

Lecture 11

protein folding

Lecture 12

prediction of protein structure

Lecture 13

Macromolecules in Biochemistry

Lecture 14

Structure of macromolecules, Interaction and denaturation)-

Assessment

 

Student Assessment

Assessment Method

Skills assessed*

Assessment Length

Schedule

Proportion

Written Examination

KU, I

3 Hour Examination

The 16th Week

60%

Oral Assessment

KU, I

Assessment Session

Term Final

5%

Practical Examination

P

2 Hour Examination

The 15th Week

30%

Semester work

KU, I

Continuous Assessment

 

5%

*KU: Knowledge and Understanding, I: Intellectual, P: Professional, T: Transferable

List of references

 

Course notes:

Course notes and Laboratory manual authorized by the Council of Department of Chemistry.

Essential Books:

(1) "Physical chemistry", 6th edition, P.W. atkins, Oxford University press (1998), by P.W. Atkins

(2) Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms, 2nd edition, J.H. Espenson, McGraw- Hill, New York (1995).

(3) " Kinetics and Mechanism", 3rd edition, by J. W. Moore and R. G. Pearson, John Wiley& Sons (1981).

(4) Chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics, 1st edition, P. L. Houston, McGraw- Hill, New York (2001).

(5) Principles of Biochemistry. Emil L. Smith,Ph.D. Seventh edition (1999).printed and bound by B and JO Enterprise PTE LTD. Singapore.

 


 

Course Title

Physiology

 

Plant physiology

 

Animal Physiology

Course Code

13064

Academic Year

2008/2009  

Coordinator

Prof. : Baheyya Abd El-Salam, Prof. Abel Monem Heazi

Other Staff

Prof. Samha A. Dwedar, Prof. Zeinab Ebrahim Atia

 

 

Semester

Semester 1

Level

Level 3 

Pre-Requisite

 

Course Delivery

Lecture  

14 x 4h lectures  

 

Practical  

14 x 4h practicals  

Parent Department

Botany Department, Zoology Department

Date of Approval

July, 2008

 

Aims

 

1. This course of Plant physiology consists of two parts and both together gives an opportunity for students to understand of the basic principles of the regulation of metabolites in the plant.  It is also provide them with information about plant growth regulators and the factors controlling their work in the internal and external of the plant cells.

2. The course of Animal Physiology will enable students to be:  familiarize with the principles and basic facts of Animal Physiology and with some of the laboratory techniques and equipment used in the acquisition of physiological data. The emphasis will be on mammalian physiology. The course will focus on organ-system physiology, however, cellular and molecular mechanisms will be discussed in order to present a current view of physiological principles. Furthermore, emphasis will be placed on nervous, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, digestive, and endocrine physiology. Where appropriate, basic chemical and physical laws will be reviewed in order to enhance and to promote student understanding.

 

Contents

 

 Part one:

hormones (one hour / week)

Lecture 1

Development and growth

Lecture 2

The hormone function

Lecture 3

The factors inducing hormonal function

Lecture 4

The environmental conditions affecting hormonal function

Lecture 5

The effect hormone on the principle (basic) vital processes

Lecture 6

The basics of hormonal classification

Lecture 7

The divisions of hormones.

Lecture 8

The function and division of auxins 

Lecture 9

The function and division of gibbrelinates 

Lecture 10

The function and division of cytokinines

Lecture 11

The function and division of ethylene

Lecture 12

The function and division of abscissic acid

Lecture 13

Revision

Lecture 14

Free Discussion in the course

 Part two:

 Enzymes (one hour / week)

Lecture 1

Properties of enzymes

Lecture 2

Cofactors

Lecture 3

Active site

Lecture 4

Catalytic efficiency

Lecture 5

Specificity, regulation and other properties

Lecture 6

Location of enzymes within the cells

Lecture 7

Factors affecting enzyme activity

Lecture 8

Molecular mechanism of feedback inhibition

Lecture 9

Enzymic control of metabolism

Lecture 10

Nomenclature and classification

Lecture 11

Isozymes

Lecture 12

Multienzymes

Lecture 13

Enzyme kinetic

Lecture 14

Revision

Assessment

The module consists of two parts

 Part Three: 

 Animal Physiology  (Two hours / week)

Lecture 1

Food: Classification of food constituents, Proteins, carbohydrates, fats, minerals, water, vitamines

Lecture 3

Nutrition: Ingestion, feeding mechanisms, digestion, enzymes, physiology of digestioh, absorption, assimilation, egestion and defication

Lecture 2

Composition of the diet. An overview of vertebrate digestion. absorption

Lecture 3

Metabolism: General metabolism, protein metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, fat metabolism

Lecture 4

Respiration: Definition, respiratory mechanism, respiratory pigments, respiratory quotient, respiratory exchanges in the tissues, carbon dioxide transport, anerobiosis

Lecture 5

Circulation: Circulating media, hemolymph, lymph, blood, coagulation of blood,, blood groups, types of circulatory system, types of hearts, physiological properties of heart muscles, origin and conduction of heart beats, myogenic hearts, neurogenic hearts

Lecture 6

Excertion: Types of excretory procedures, excretory organs in animals, structure of nephron, metabolism of nitrogen:

Lecture 7

Osmoregulation:.                             

Lectures

8 & 9

Neuromuscular system - 1: Muscular system, types of muscle fibers, chemical composition of muscles, properties of voluntary muscles, muscle contraction, physical and chemical aspects of muscle contraction,

Lectures 10 & 11

Neuromuscular system - 1:Nervous system, nervous coordination, nerve cells, nerve fibers, neuroglia, nerve impulse, neuromuscular junction, nerve reflexes, reflex arc, types of reflexes, autonomic nervous system.

Lectures 12 & 13

Chemical coordination: Endicrine in invertebrates, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenals, pituitary, iselets of Langerhans, sex gland, thymus, pineals.

Lecture 14

Sense organs, classification of receptors,

Assessment

 

Student Assessment

Assessment Method

Skills assessed*

Assessment Length

Schedule

Proportion

Written Examination

KU, I

3 Hour Examination

The 16th Week

60%

Oral Assessment

KU, I

Assessment Session

Term Final

5%

Practical Examination

P

2 Hour Examination

The 15th Week

30%

Semester work

KU, I

Continuous Assessment

 

5%

*KU: Knowledge and Understanding, I: Intellectual, P: Professional, T: Transferable

List of references

 

Course notes:

Course notes and Laboratory manual authorized by the Council of Department of Botany.

Essential Books:

Review of plant physiology, Harold A. Harper 1974 Dohn Wiley & sens, New york.cademic Bookshop, Cairo.

Plant Physiology a Treatise by F. C. Steward, ACADEMIC press Inc., Publication, New York (1986)

 

 

Fourth Year (Level Four)

 

Semester - 2

 

 

Course Title

Amino-acids & Protein Metabolism & Heterocycles

 

 

Course Code

23061

Academic Year

2008 / 2009

Coordinator

Prof. Tarek M Mohamed

Other Staff

 

 

 

Semester

Semester 2  

Level

Level Three

Pre-Requisite

 

Course Delivery

Lecture  

14 x 3h lectures  

 

Practical  

14 x 6h practicals  

Parent Department

Biochemistry Department

Date of Approval

July, 2008

 

Aims

 

- To metabolism of proteins and catabolism of carbon skeletons of amino acids.

- To study biosynthesis of non-essential amino acids & biosynthesis of amino acid derived compounds.

- The synthetic pathways for Protein synthesis.

- Study of the structure, reactivity, and synthesis of compounds occurring in nature with special emphasize on terpenes, and alkaloids.

- Learn about the different families of terpenes & alkaloids: structure determination, synthesis, properties and examples of important members.

- To provide introduction to laboratory techniques for investigation, and identification of organic compounds. 

 

Contents

 

 Part 1:

  (Heterocycles) One hour/ week

Lecture 1

Classification and nomenclature of heterocycls

Lecture 2

Six-membered rings with one-hetero atom: pyridine

Lecture 3

pyrilium salts, pyrans,

Lecture 4

pyrones, thiopyrans). 

Lecture 5

Six-membered rings with two-hetero atom: pyrimidines,

Lecture 6

pyridazines,

Lectures 7 & 8

diazines, oxazines, thiazines.

Lecture 9

Condenced six-membered rings: quinoline, isiquinoline

Lecture 10

quinaldine,

Lecture 11

phenoxazines

Lectures 12 & 13

Seven-membered rings with one or two-hetero atom

 Part 2:

 (Protein & Amino-acids Metabolism) One hour / week

Lecture 1

Introduction

Lecture 2

metabolism Protein turnover

Lecture 3

Catabolism of the carbon skeletons of amino acids

Lecture 4

Deamination and transamination of amino acids

Lecture 5

Biosynthesis of non-essential amino acids

Lecture 6

Biosynthesis of glycine,methionine

Lecture 7

Biosynthesis of arginine, glutamate, proline

Lecture 8

Biosynthesis of tyrosine, tryptophane

Lecture 9

Biosynthesis of amino acid derived compounds

Lecture 10

Urea cycle

Lecture 11

Protein synthesis

Lecture 12

Clininical manifestation of protein deficiency

Assessment

 

Student Assessment

Assessment Method

Skills assessed*

Assessment Length

Schedule

Proportion

Written Examination

KU, I

3 Hour Examination

The 16th Week

60%

Oral Assessment

KU, I

Assessment Session

Term Final

5%

Practical Examination

P

2 Hour Examination

The 15th Week

30%

Semester work

KU, I

Continuous Assessment

 

5%

*KU: Knowledge and Understanding, I: Intellectual, P: Professional, T: Transferable

List of references

Course notes:

Course notes and Laboratory manual authorized by the Council of Department of Chemistry.

Essential Books:

1- Heterocyclic Chemistry, 3rd Ed. Thomas L. Gilchrist.  1998.

2- Heterocyclic Chemistry, 4th  Ed. J.A. Joule & K. Mills.  Blackwell Science Ltd   2000.

3- Handbook of Heterocyclic Chemistry, 2nd  A. R. Kataritzky and A.F. Pozharskii,  Pergamon  2000.

 


 

Course Title

Nutrition and photosynthesis

 

 

Course Code

23062

Academic Year

2008/ 2009

Coordinator

Prof. Ehab M. Mohamed

Other Staff

 

 

 

Semester

Semester 2  

Level

Level Three

Pre-Requisite

 

Course Delivery

Lecture  

14 x 3h lectures  

 

Practical  

14 x 4h practicals  

Parent Department

Chemistry Department

Date of Approval

July, 2008

 

Aims

 

The aim of this course is to cover the importance of general metabolism of carbohydrate and lipids.

- Also knowing the more important cycles that participate in many biochemistry reactions. Moreover, the aim of the course is to ensure that students have skills for the intermediate reactions

- how energy produced by electron transport system and clinical manifestation of any disturbance of the intermediate reactions in the cycles .

- to cover the importance of nutrition and the energy required for the body

- Also it covers the importance for biochemical metabolism for nutrition…

- The student also must know the water and inorganic metabolism;

 

Contents

 

 Prat 1:

Nutrition

Lecture 1

Digestion and absorption of carbohydrate Catabolism of carbohydrate :, pentose

Lecture 2

glcolysis, TCA cycle

Lecture 3

phosphate pathway, glycogenolysis

Lecture 4

Electron transport system and energy requirements

Lecture 5

Anabolism of carbohydrate Glucogensis, glycogenosis

Lecture 6

Metabolism of fructose, galactose, lactose

Lecture 7

Digestion of lipids, Catabolism of Fatty acids:  Fatty acid oxidation

Lecture 8

Anabolism of fatty acids: fatty acids synthesis

Lecture 9

ketone bodies and hormonal control

Lecture 10

Nutrition requirement and energy requirement for the body,

Lecture 12

Respiratory  quantient

Lecture 12

Biological values of proteins

Lecture 13

Water metabolism

Lecture 14

inorganic elements metabolism 

 Part 2:

 Photosynthesis

Lecture 1

Introduction and historical review

Lecture 2

Chloroplast structure

Lecture 3

Transfer of energy

Lecture 4

pigments involved in photosynthesis (Chlorophyll)

Lecture 5

pigments involved in photosynthesis (Carotenoids and Phycobilins)

Lecture 6

Origin of O2 in photosynthesis and Hill reaction and light

Lecture 7

Induced electron transport and Emerson Effect

Lecture 8

photosynthetic Electron transport

Lecture 9

The Path of carbon in Photosynthesis

Lecture 10

Photosynthesis and Enzymes

Lecture 11

C4-Plants and Crassulacean acid Metabolism

Lecture 12

Factors affecting photosynthesis

Lecture 13

Photorespiration

Assessment

 

Student Assessment

Assessment Method

Skills assessed*

Assessment Length

Schedule

Proportion

Written Examination

KU, I

3 Hour Examination

The 16th Week

60%

Oral Assessment

KU, I

Assessment Session

Term Final

5%

Practical Examination

P

2 Hour Examination

The 15th Week

30%

Semester work

KU, I

Continuous Assessment

 

5%

*KU: Knowledge and Understanding, I: Intellectual, P: Professional, T: Transferable

List of references

 

Course notes:

Course notes and Laboratory manual authorized by the Council of Department of Chemistry.

Essential Books:

Principles of Biochemistry. Emil L. Smith,Ph.D. Seventh edition (1999).printed and bound by B and JO Enterprise PTE LTD. Singapore.

 


 

Course Title

Physical and Analytical Chemistry

 

Chromatographic Methods of Analysis

 

Electrochemical Methods of Analysis

 

Chemistry of Transition Elements

 

Coordination Chemistry

Course Code

23063

Academic Year

2007 / 2008

Coordinator

Prof. Mohamed Y. Ayad

Other Staff

 

Semester

Semester 1  

Level

Level Three

Pre-Requisite

 

Course Delivery

Lecture  

14 x 4h lectures  

 

Practical  

14 x 6h practical  

Parent Department

Chemistry Department

Date of Approval

July, 2008

 

Aims

 

1.study the physical methods of instrumental analysis focusing on the chromatographic and electrochemical techniques used in chemical analysis with emphasize on the basic principles and the main differences between such techniques, factors controlling their efficiency, design of technique and procedures of separation. Develop in students the skill of applying the different chromatographic techniques in separation, qualitative and quantitative estimation of chemical, biological and pharmaceutical samples. 

2. give a descriptive survey on the chemistry of transition elements focusing on the electronic structure and properties of the main and inner transition elements (d- and f-block elements), and study the structural features, physical and chemical properties of their inorganic and coordination compounds as well as the physical methods used for examining them. Provide students with the basic principles of writing formulas and nomenclature of coordination complexes as well as the methods of predicting their geometrical structures, and discuss in details the theories describing the structure and properties (spectral, magnetic and stability) of coordination complexes like crystal field, ligand field and molecular orbital theory.

 

Contents

 

 Part 1

(Chromatographic Methods of Analysis) one hour / week

Lecture 1

Introduction to chromatography.

Lecture 2,3

Plan chromatography: principle, techniques and applications

Lecture 4,5

Electrophoresis: principle, techniques and applications

Lecture 6

Column chromatography: principle, technique and applications

Lecture 7,8

Gel chromatography: principle, technique and applications

Lecture 9,10

Ion-exchange chromatography: principle, techniques and applications

Lecture 11,12

Gas chromatography: principle, technique and applications

Lecture 13

Solvent extraction: principle, techniques and applications.

Lecture 14

High pressure-liquid chromatography (HPLC)

  Part 2

(Electrochemical Methods of Analysis) one hour / week

Lecture 1

Introduction to the electrochemical methods.

Lecture 2,3

Potentiometry; principles, and different kinds of ion-selective electrodes.

Lecture 4-6

Applications of ion-selective electrodes.

Lecture 7

Polarography and voltammetry: Principles and Ikovie equation.

Lecture 8

Analytical applications of different polarographic and voltammetric techniques

Lecture 9

Amperometric titrations

Lecture 10,11

Electrogravimetry and coulometry; principles and applications.

Lecture 12,13

Conductance; theory, techniques and applications (conductometric titrations).

 Part 3

 (Chemistry of transition elements) one hour / week

Lecture 1

General introduction on the chemistry of transition elements.

Lecture 2

Electronic structure and oxidation states of transition elements.

Lecture 3

Atomic and ionic radii and correlation with the electronic structure.

Lecture 4

Magnetism and magnetic properties of transition elements and their compounds.

Lecture 5,6

Theories discussing properties of the transition metal coordination complexes.

Lecture 7

Scandium and vanadium groups (oxidation states, reactivity, complexes and organometallic compounds).

Lecture 8

Chromium group.

Lecture 9

Manganese group.

Lecture 10,11

Fe, Co and Ni groups.

Lecture 12

Copper group.

Lecture 13

Lanthanides and actinides (definition and properties).

Lecture 14

Importance of transition elements in biological systems and catalysis.

Part 4

 (Coordination Chemistry) one hour / week

Lecture 1

Introduction to coordination chemistry.

Lecture 2

Nomenclature of coordination compounds.

Lecture 3 & 4 

Structure determination of coordination complexes.

Lecture 5

Nature of metal-ligand bonding (Valance bond theory)

Lecture 6

Properties of coordination compounds.

Lecture 7

Nature of metal-ligand bonding (Crystal field theory)

Lecture 8

Nature of metal-ligand bonding (Ligand field theory)

Lecture 9

Isomerism in inorganic complexes (Structural isomerism).

Lecture 10

Isomerism in inorganic complexes (Stereoisomerism).

Lecture 11& 12

Stability of complexes (Factors affecting the stability, thermodynamic and kinetic stability)

Lecture 13

Some applications of coordination ompounds in biological systems.

Student Assessment

Assessment Method

Skills assessed*

Assessment Length

Schedule

Proportion

Written Examination

KU, I

3 Hour Examination

The 16th Week

60%

Oral Assessment

KU, I

Assessment Session

Term Final

5%

Practical Examination

P

2 Hour Examination

The 15th Week

30%

Semester work

KU, I

Continuous Assessment

 

5%

*KU: Knowledge and Understanding, I: Intellectual, P: Professional, T: Transferable

List of references

 

Course notes:

Course notes and Laboratory manual authorized by the Council of Department of Chemistry.

Essential Books:

(1) "Physical chemistry", 6th edition, P.W. atkins, Oxford University press (1998), by P.W. Atkins

(2) Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms, 2nd edition, J.H. Espenson, McGraw- Hill, New York (1995).

(3) " Kinetics and Mechanism", 3rd edition, by J. W. Moore and R. G. Pearson, John Wiley& Sons (1981).

(4) Chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics, 1st edition, P. L. Houston, McGraw- Hill, New York (2001).

 


 

Course Title

Plant Microbiology

 

(Mycology-Bacteriology and Virology)

Course Code

23064

Academic Year

2008/2009 

Coordinator

Prof.Dr.Yehia A.-G.Mahmoud

Semester

Semester2  

Level

Level 3  

Other staff

 

Pre-Requisite

 

Course delivery

Lecture  

16 x 2h lectures

 

Practical  

16 x 2h practical  

Parent Department

Botany Department

 

Aims

 

This course gives students an opportunity to  the basic principles of microbiology in terms of cell structure, taxonomy, growth and physiology.  It trains students in  isolation and purifications of microbial isolates; and  evaluating and testing the fungal and antibiotics activities.

 

Contents

 

Part I

Mycology

Lecture 1

Classification of fungi by different updated proposed systems

Lecture 2

Studying different fungal subdivision, genera and species with illustrated examples

Lecture 3

Mastigomycotina

Lecture 4

Zygomycotina

Lecture 5

Ascomycotina

Lecture 6

Basidiomycotina

Lecture 7

Imperfect Fungi (Deuteromycotina)

Lecture 8

Growth in fungi (growth curve, growth rhythms, estimation of growth

Lecture 9

Different methods of fungi isolation 

Lecture10

Different methods of fungi purification and single spore isolation

Lecture11

Antibiotic production by fungi

Lecture12

Polyene Antifungal drugs

Lecture13

Azoles antifungal drugs

Lecture14

Others antifungal drugs like, Flu cytosine, Greiseofulvin

Part II

Bacteriology and Virology:

Lecture 1

Introduction, Classification and Identification of Bacteria

Lecture 2

Elimination and Inhibition of bacterial activities

Antibiotics.

Lecture 3

The bacterial cell structure

Lecture 4

Growth and reproduction

Lecture 5

Bacterial growth measurements

Lecture 6

Bacterial differentiation

Lecture 7

Bacterial conjugation

Lecture 8

Bacteria of Medical Importance

Lecture 9

Discovery and Distinctive characters of viruses

Lecture10

Structure, size and multiplication of viruses

Lecture11

Human and animal viral diseases

Lecture12

Viruses and their transmission

Assessment

 

Student Assessment

Assessment Method

Skills assessed*

Assessment Length

Schedule

Proportion

Written Examination

KU, I

3 Hour Examination

The 16th Week

60%

Oral Assessment

KU, I

Assessment Session

Term Final

5%

Practical Examination

P

2 Hour Examination

The 15th Week

30%

Semester work

KU, I

Continuous Assessment

 

5%

*KU: Knowledge and Understanding, I: Intellectual, P: Professional, T: Transferable

List of references

 

Course notes:

Course notes and Laboratory manual authorized by the Council of Department of Botany.

Essential Books:

Onions, A.H.S., Allsopp, D. and Eggins, H.O.W. (1981): Smith Introduction to Industrial Mycology 7th ed.Edward Arnold (Publishers) LTD, London

 


 

Course Title

Computer

 

 

Course Code

23068

Academic Year

2008/ 2009

Coordinator

Professor

Level

Level 3  

Semester

Semester 2 

 

 

Other Staff

 

Pre-Requisite

GCSE level Biology or its equivalent  

Course Delivery

Lecture  

14 x 1h lectures  

 

Practical  

14 x 1h practicals  

Parent Department

Zoology Department

Date of Approval

July, 2008

 

Aims

 

This course will enable students to acquire a range of transferable skills that are important for students of zoology

- to develop their capability for information retrieval and presentation, and proficiency in the use of IT effectively in the context of their studies.

- to underpin academic work throughout undergraduate studies, and after graduation.

- to provide them with opportunities to develop their skills required for: team working, oral presentation of scientific material, (career choice, producing their Curriculum vitae (CV) and obtaining satisfying employment).

 

Level Three:

Level Three: Spread Sheet: Preparation of graphical information, typically graphs showing quantitative data and photomicrographs is an important part of presentation, and an ability to prepare clear, easily interpretable figures using commercial graphics software is an invaluable transferable skill.

Lectures 1 - 5

Introduction to Spread-sheet analysis.

Assignment 1

Familiarise students with use of Spread Sheet using real experimental data, and use of graphics. (Simple histogram forms)

Lectures 6 - 10

Spread-sheet analysis - 1: Applying graphical techniques to analyse data.

Assignment 2

(Other forms of presentation: pie, …)

 

Spread-sheet analysis - 2:

Assignment 3

Callibration curves and graphic techniques.

Assessment

 

 

Student Assessment

Assessment Method

Skills assessed*

Assessment Length

Schedule

Proportion

Written Examination

KU, I

1 Hour Examination

Term Final

60%

Practical Examination

KU, I, P

1 Hour Examination t

Term Final

30%

Semester work

P, T

Continuous Assessment

 

10%

*KU: Knowledge and Understanding, I: Intellectual, P: Professional, T: Transferable

List of references

 

Course notes:

Notes given to students at each section describe the tasks to be completed, therefore no particular book(s) recommended.

 


 

 

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